Look Ma I’m on TV!

So my natural instinct is to want to go off and run and hide somewhere because my Ted talk is finally up on TED’s website…I barely remember what I said, I was so nervous and ish…and its also very personal.

But I might as well enjoy my 15 mins of fame on the interwebs…maybe one day when Gabriella is Googling me in a few years she’ll see that her mama is more than just a mean disciplinarian (hehehe).

Edit: low-bandwidth folk can try Youtube.

41 comments to Look Ma I’m on TV!

  • Linda O

    Congrats Ory! What an amazing speech.

    You’re truly an inspiration and especially to those of us in the diaspora and those of us struggling with our personal decisions as to why we’re working so hard to build another nation – when we can be doing even more at home!

  • Ory,
    I have just seen your video on TED. You are an amazing individual and so is your your personal story — a relevant example of the resilience of us Africans. One of the things that stuck with me was your call on us to take interest in the individual because ” usually the individual in Africa carries a lot of people behind them.”

    Equally important was your challenge to us to take charge of matters of our continent. As a journalist I often run into Africans complaining about the role of Western media in tarnishing our image. My answer to them is exactly what you said: Western media do so because they know nothing about us. If we want that to change, we have to start telling our stories.

    The example you gave about the Swahili Wiki is also evident in the efforts to better the lives of our people. We have well-meaning outsiders doing work in Africa, but they have no idea how to go about it. We need Africans to take a larger role so these good people can learn that not all Africans lack clean water — that we are a diverse continent with diverse needs.

    Keep doing the good work and I hope we cross paths someday.

    Edwin O. Okong’o
    Journalist, Memoirist, Humorist

  • Bravo. So moving, and so very real. Keep that fire burning.

  • It was so inspiring. I am in the US and it got me thinking of going back home after my studies because my continent needs me.

  • Itchy

    What can I say Ory !!! Good to see you and great to hear your passion. You did a great job ! Totally relatable experiences.

    All the best Ory !!!

    Itchy – Atlanta, GA

  • Penny Muriithi

    Excellent presentation. Every single word so resonates!
    It is only us-Africans who can change our destiny and who can change how the rest of the world perceives of us.
    Ory Im on that same train you are on in pushing for a better continent.
    Courage!

  • Ory,

    Great talk! You really hit the nail on the head. People rarely focus on the positive, especially here in the United States. Keep up the great work! I look forward to seeing more in the future!

  • Ory,

    Great talk. The personal story resonated with me.
    Be well

  • Oz

    I watched it, pretty neat. You had me thinking about moving from NY to Nigeria for a minute.

  • Stella

    Great talk!

  • ziwani

    if parliament does not change then change will come to parliament from the pple.

  • Ory

    That was a BRILLIANT speech not to mention VERY PROFOUND. You have always been a trailblazer but after that piece you are LEGIT :-) . Im touched and I am sure many others are. And please stop that nonensese ati you wanna hide coz you have everything to be proud of personally and as a daughter of Africa. Keep blazing the trails.

  • I love the afro! Go girl! We are proud of you…

  • Ory, thank you for sharing your skills with the rest of the world. Thank you God or Allah or whoever for creating Ory.
    Ory, you are a perfect presenter. This video should be shown in all Kenyan universities, so inspiring for young people.
    Such a pity it takes so long to download the file here in Kenya…

  • Was just listening to your talk. Very strong speech, keep up the good work. All the best, Joep

  • Vince

    Ory – this was a good presentation. I liked the appeal and also got touched with your personal stories. They are a reminiscent of what the majority of Kenyans go through in their daily lives. It also reminded me of what my mother went through begging a headmaster of a certain school to admit me into form one and he kept on humiliating her.

    I have a comment about us people in the Diaspora who are involved in Information Technology. We tend to have problems going back and getting jobs. I have tried to get a job and interact with local IT professionals in Kenya but I never seem to fit in. The skill sets we have here in the US can not be easily transferred and used in Kenya or Africa. Folks back in Kenya say that their technology is more based on cell phone while in the US it’s a much a different animal. This gigantic difference tends to discourage most people from moving back to Kenya/Africa for the fear that they will not fit in.

    If my memory serves me right, there used to be a story about a journalist called Hilary Ngweno of the Weekly Review. This guy went to a university in the West and studied Nuclear Science. When he returned back to Kenya, he could not get a job in Nuclear Science field and ended up being a journalist. That is what people dread most.

  • Mour D.

    Well, Ory! No need to hide…proud Africans just want to stay thank you and not bother you anymore…lol! But, Seriously, your talk was great…not surprise coming from an African Queen…so eloquent and the message was very compelling. Point taken and, hopefully, well received by the audience…it sure is up to us to restore our dignity. Need I to say more…don’t think so…so just wanted to mention that not only Kenyans, but Young Africans appreciate your talk, work, and leadership.

    Many Blessings and, hopefully, partnerships if ever our roads cross.

    M.D.

  • Mour D.

    Oh, forgot one thing…can’t help mentioning it…but do I sense u running the Kenyan presidency in the future…maybe not so near, but foreseeable…just asking or throwing it out there…lol

    M.D.

  • hi, ory! igreetings from brazil! i ‘ve jest saw you at ted talk. you were amazing! wish you luck on your way.

  • Sijui

    Don’t run Ory, save this clip well………..it will be trotted out over, and over, and over. When Gaby and her siblings are old enough to walk and talk, which I know for Gaby is NOW, sit their little bums down especially when they bring U’mang’aa and tell them, you’re smart and talented and gifted enough to start a multi-national, or become the head of the WTO or do whatever you want in life because MAMA SAID SO AND MAMA KNOWS! So don’t tell me there is anything you can’t do :)

  • Sara

    Your Ted talk was superb!!!:grin:
    I did not know you before watching the video but I am so glad that a friend sent me the link. I am blogging about you now :wink: I shall send you the link to “my praises” of you after the post. Best wishes

  • Dave

    I’m glad to have discovered people like you who are proactively telling the real story of Africa. A while ago, I saw the documentary “Africa Open for Business,” and it got me thinking about the real Africa, and the everyday people who are doing great things there.

    I’m Canadian, and I’ve never been to Africa, but I have seen how the media only shows the negative things happening in Africa, and I understand why it does such a disservice to Africa by shaping non-African people’s opinions towards pity.

    I am proof that your messages from Africa are getting out there. I’ve never been to Africa, I’ve never met you, but I’m sitting here in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, and I’m reading the words that you’ve taken the time to write.

    Thank you!

  • Anthony

    I only found your blog & Mzalendo from the TED talk. I’ve watched about 80% of the TED videos and few have have made as much of an impression as yours.

    Mzalendo is such a great idea. Every country needs one. The TED talk is great publicity.

  • That speech has woken me out of my “polictical/developmental” apathy.

  • That was a very inspiring talk, Ory. I really love the part you talk about content on the interwebs, we have to tell our own stories or watch others tell for us. A lot of influential/illustrious people have spoken at TED over the years since Richard Saul Wurman started it. I am button-bustingly proud to know you are on that list as well.

  • Jeff Barnes

    Personal is powerful. Excellent talk. The reality and the challenges that successful Africans face is often ignored in the simplistic portrayals of Africain the media. Your talk helped to make that real.

  • Erick

    Great talk, Ory! The slides in the streaming video version are fixed, but the “Video to desktop (zipped mp4)” still shows the wrong slides. I left a comment on the TED site.

  • sunrise3

    ultra slow bandwidth has prevented me from watching the clip but all is not lost, i will wait for the wee hours of the night to get a clear connection. the comparison on youtube between you and obama made me smile

  • Hi Ory…Congrats on the presentation!im trying to get the contacts of many Kenyan bloggers for a bloggercon.Details at my latest post http://siku-moja.blogspot.com/2008/09/kenyan-bloggercon-and-bloggers-invite.htmll

  • wangari

    big up mama!! it took forever to download but was worth every minute. so proud of you…

  • David

    Awesome stuff Ory!! I think all the appropriate English words have been used up in the responses so far so all I can manage is Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious! Totally relevant, totally moving, totally needs us to get up and DO something!

  • well done you for opening up your heart to the world – it is that vulnerability yet strength that i found to be so awe-inspiring. keep on keepin’ on! :smile:

  • Toni Germany said,

    First of all, congratulations on your performance, you did and looked great and you are a good advisor for African heritage. Am so proud of you.

  • John

    Your talk was a shining example of “right”. i will now keep up with your blog you have insight. your goverment views are perfect, keep it up we need more people in the world like you

  • Anon Kenyan

    Wow. W.O.W. Wow. That’s all I can say. I hope you have plans to get into Kenyan politics one day soon because I personally would campaign for you to be President. Please get involved, because we need an activist like you INSIDE Parliament, making changes from within. Great work.

  • Hi Ory
    Just finished watching your video. Wow! I need to get your contact details because I share your vision and want to do more than just admire and wish you luck.
    Visit our website and when you are ready’ please do make contact

  • Mimi

    Awesome!!! Gabi (and the rest of us) have some big shoes to fit in!

  • Taz

    Great stuff, girl. Your message is indeed inspiring.
    Africa arise! This is our moment.

  • Odada

    Hi Ory, just watched your talk. I am a kenyan doctor in Germany. You made me feel i should go home and start something there. I always try to tell the positive side about africa here and pple really appreciate it. So we tell our stories , we interact talk cou pple are pple and we give the true picture of home. I have to show your talk to my kids. Im a mom like you. just love you. Odada

  • @wangari
    Be downloading stuff with Orbit Downloader. It’s the best I have seen so far – no adware, lighweight, amazingly fast and free with no need for registration.

  • Hey Ory,
    I have just posted your TED talk with some highlights on my blog. Here’s the link: http://peternjenga.blogspot.com/2008/09/ted-talks-ory-okolloh-on-becoming.html
    That was nice. I do however note that the slides were not showing as you advanced them – and given the laughter from the audience, they must have been really funny slides.
    Could the TED people correct that? Perhaps you can let us know on KenyanPundit once they communicate the corrections are done.
    Keep up the good work even at the new-look Ushahidi. That’s the Spirit!

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